WLEI - Lean Enterprise Institute’s Podcast
Designing the Future: A WLEI Podcast with Rivian CEO RJ Scaringe and COO Jim Morgan

Designing the Future: A WLEI Podcast with Rivian CEO RJ Scaringe and COO Jim Morgan

February 17, 2020

If you do not yet know the company Rivian you will undoubtedly know it very soon.
In 2019 Rivian made waves in the auto industry by announcing two “electric
adventure vehicles”, the R1T – an electric pickup truck - and the R1S - an electric
SUV. Both vehicles are expected to launch in the United States later this
year and globally in 2021. Rivian is also developing a fleet of electric delivery
vans to fulfill a 100,000-unit order placed by Amazon. In the last twelve
months the electric vehicle company has raised 3 billion dollars.

Listen in to hear how R.J. and Jim are bringing this vision to life.

Reference links:

What’s the Problem: Andrew Lingel Discusses Transforming a Family Business through Knowledge, Grit, and Outrage

What’s the Problem: Andrew Lingel Discusses Transforming a Family Business through Knowledge, Grit, and Outrage

February 10, 2020

Andrew Lingel, President of United Plastic Fabricating, discusses leading lean transformation of a family business through knowledge, grit, and outrage.

On the Job with Ron Kelner, President and COO of the Deublin Company

On the Job with Ron Kelner, President and COO of the Deublin Company

February 3, 2020
Ron describes the Deublin Company's business system built with lean thinking that puts human development at the center
 
Coachable: A Model Story, Coaching Work Improvement

Coachable: A Model Story, Coaching Work Improvement

January 27, 2020

January 27, 2020

Featuring: Deborah McGee and Bryant Sanders

As this series continues to explore the implications and dynamic of “coaching” in a business environment, Bryant Sanders models the mindset and techniques for coaching work improvement to develop people. Bryant draws on 26 years Toyota experience to facilitate his coaching techniques with a team in the field leading to a dramatic improvement in the work. He walks us through the story from deciding where to focus, to earning the team’s trust, facilitating reflection solidifying the what and the why and then leveraging one another’s strengths to upskill the team and eliminate difficulty and waste in the work. An excellent study in masterful coaching on the floor where the work happens.

We invite your thoughts and experiences about coaching and being coached: email your stories! pod@lean.org

Related Articles/ content:

·       The Hard Work of Making Hard Work Easier (article)

·       Job Breakdown Sheet (pdf)

·       Making Hard Work Easier (article)

CEO Transition – an obstacle or an opportunity?

CEO Transition – an obstacle or an opportunity?

January 20, 2020

Too often, a change in executive leadership can bring a lean transformation to a grinding halt.  But that has not been the case at Lynn Community Health Center (LCHC).

 

Within two years of the start of their lean journey, LCHC CEO Lori Abrams Berry announced her intention to retire. The immediate reaction from the LCHC community was concern that her departure would impact the progress made on advancing lean thinking and practice with improved outcomes and engagement of its team members. Instead, the impending CEO transition was embraced as a challenge, a gap to tackle.  Learn how LCHC approached this executive leadership transition to ensure the continuity of their lean transformation. 

My Personal Turning Point: Reflecting on a Decade as a Lean Coach

My Personal Turning Point: Reflecting on a Decade as a Lean Coach

January 14, 2020

Josh Howell shares his decade-end reflections, focusing on why he left Starbucks in 2013. His reasons may surprise you. He also interrogates the question, “If a company discontinues a formal lean initiative, or lean program, or lean team, does that mean its lean implementation has failed?” 

What’s the problem: A conversation with Pat Greco on transforming education through rapid problem solving

What’s the problem: A conversation with Pat Greco on transforming education through rapid problem solving

January 6, 2020

Pat Greco In 2011, Dr. Pat Greco began as the superintendent of the Menomonee Falls School District in Wisconsin. She faced no shortage of problems: a suspension rate seven times higher than the state average, performance gaps across income and race, cost overruns, and a failure to meet performance goals defined under the No Child Left Behind Act among others. Not to mention a new administration was upending collective bargaining for public sector employees instilling fear within the teachers she was setting out to lead. By the end of her tenure she had led the school district to rank as one of the country’s best. She did so primarily through PDCA cycles in the classroom between teachers and students, as well as between management and the board of education.

Coachable: Creating the Environment for Effective Coaching

Coachable: Creating the Environment for Effective Coaching

December 23, 2019

December 23, 2019

Featuring: Deborah McGee and Jeff Smith

As this series continues to explore the implications and dynamic of “coaching” in a business environment, Jeff Smith reveals the importance of the learning environment for impactful coaching. Jeff draws on 22 years experience within the Toyota Production System and recalls his coaching experience at New United Motor, and later as a coach in many organizations. We talk about coaching in the front office as well as shop floor, engaging with problems using A3 thinking, and mechanisms to signal abnormal conditions inherently perfect for effective coaching moments.

We invite your thoughts and experiences about coaching and being coached: email your stories! pod@lean.org

Related Articles/ content:

 

Dying for a Paycheck? Must work be toxic for employees, and how can a more sustainable approach emerge?

Dying for a Paycheck? Must work be toxic for employees, and how can a more sustainable approach emerge?

December 16, 2019

In his new book Dying for A Paycheck, Stanford University Graduate School of Business Professor Jeffrey Pfeffer argues that there is an overwhelmingly compelling case to be made that the workplace profoundly affects human health and wellbeing, and that these psychosocial stressors have gotten worse in recent years. His book vividly details how the costs are enormous to both individuals and to companies and to society. He believes that If we're going to address this, we need to see the problem and its enormous scope. In this podcast Pfeffer shares thoughts with LEI editor Tom Ehrenfeld on potential countermeasures to this problem. 

Some key points:

 Good work starts with good job design. “The companies that are really going to solve the problem of unsafe work, just as they've done for physical safety, have to begin by thinking about every aspect of the job and job design. And that's where I think there is a great deal of compatibility between the principles of Lean and what I'm talking about. This begins with basically redesigning the work, and eliminating the stuff that is harmful, unnecessary, and stressful.”

Lean principles can help transform the design of work for more humane practice. “We have to be willing to redesign the psychosocial aspects of work if we're going to make it psychologically healthier and less stressful,” says Pfeffer. “Just as we've redesigned the physical equipment to make work environments safer, we have to be willing to redesign the psychosocial aspects of work if we're going to make it psychologically healthier and less stressful.

Tackling this problem requires acknowledging toxic work as a challenge to address. “I think we need to make human life and human wellbeing at least as important as economic outcomes. What does it profit us to have a fabulously high GDP if life expectancy is diminishing? What does it profit us as a society to have high stock market with a suicide rate that's up 70% in the last eight or nine years with widespread depression? We need a much broader definition of what success looks like.”

On the Job: A conversation with Dr. Lynn Kelley about sustaining change at Union Pacific

On the Job: A conversation with Dr. Lynn Kelley about sustaining change at Union Pacific

December 9, 2019

Dr. Lynn Kelley was hired by Union Pacific to lead the introduction of the “UP Way” company-wide. The UP Way at that time consisted of a select few lean practices that the company had decided were foundational for their operations. In this conversation, Dr. Kelley shares how her Ph.D in Research and Evaluations informed the unique approach taken for the implementation of the UP Way.

The "Playbook" of Sustaining Change on the Lean Post

CI Sustainment: A Hiding Place for Complexity on the Lean Post